Research

New RFPs

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Current Studies

Learn more about the research that is already under way as part of this effort: 

Education Development Center is conducting a mixed-methods study in partnership with 10 Maine school districts. The aims of the study are to quantitatively characterize profiles of student-centered learning implementation by leveraging student feedback survey data, and to investigate the relationship between implementation and student outcomes. We will focus specifically on how this relationship may differ according to student economic need and prior achievement. The qualitative component of the study will go deeper to situate quantitative findings within state, district, and school context for three participating districts. Quantitative results will inform the selection of sites for qualitative data collection. Study data will include responses on the Competency-Based Learning Survey for Students and student-level administrative data from all students in grades 9-12, along with data from interviews, focus groups, and document review in three districts.
Funding provided by: The Nellie Mae Education Foundation

Research indicates that collaboration may be a particularly important feature of student-centered learning for meeting the needs of traditionally underserved students, yet racial/ethnic differences in students’ experiences of collaboration are an aspect of personalized learning that is often overlooked. The American Institutes for Research (AIR) Learning With Others study examines the role that collaboration plays in the personalization of learning within student-centered classrooms and associated outcomes for Grade 9–12 students from varying racial/ethnic backgrounds, particularly those who identify as Black. This study will address three questions: (1) How are students’ experiences of collaboration related to student outcomes? (2) To what extent do opportunities for collaboration, classroom experiences, and outcomes, as well as relationships between among factors, differ by race and ethnicity? (3) What contextual, school-level factors do teachers identify as helping or hindering their ability to provide opportunities for collaboration in diverse student-centered classrooms? To address our research questions, we will collect in-depth student-, teacher-, and classroom-level data from four to six student-centered high schools that employ personalized learning approaches, offer regular opportunities for collaboration, and serve a racially diverse population of students, including at least 25% students who identify as Black.
Funding provided by: The Nellie Mae Education Foundation

American Institutes for Research and New Tech Network are partnering to study teacher practices that support the development of student agency. Four New Tech Network schools will participate in a Networked Improvement Community (NIC) to design, test, and revise these teacher practices. The goal of the NIC will be to develop a menu of effective teaching practices that promote key elements of student agency, such as self-efficacy, self-regulated learning, and persistence. This project also will examine how measures of student agency are related to students’ academic outcomes, and whether these relationships are similar across students from different racial/ethnic backgrounds.
Co-funding provided by: The Nellie Mae Education Foundation and Overdeck Family Foundation

The High Tech High K-12 schools and the High Tech High Graduate School of Education have partnered with middle and high schools from four districts across San Diego county to improve student agency and learning outcomes in math, particularly for students from traditionally marginalized groups. This community will use improvement science as a framework for testing, refining and spreading “high leverage” practices that reframe mathematical struggle as learning, engage students in collaborative problem solving, shift mathematical discourse to be more student-centered, make mathematical thinking visible, and develop student-led assessment structures that promote a growth mindset.
Co-funding provided by: The Nellie Mae Education Foundation and Overdeck Family Foundation

Investigating the Evidence for Student-Centered Learning

We are seeking proposals from researchers and research institutions that describe one- to two-year research projects that investigate the contexts, components, and impacts of student-centered learning approaches. In particular, we are looking to understand the effectiveness of specific student-centered practices, the conditions that support (and undermine) them, who most (and least) benefits from them, and why.

Access the full RFP and all submission information

The Implementation of Student-Centered Learning Approaches

We are seeking proposals from researchers from grant-eligible research institutions that describe two-year projects investigating the implementation of student-centered learning practices, while also measuring the effects of these practices on students, particularly those who are members of historically underserved subgroups.

Access the full RFP and all submission information

Investigating the Evidence for Student-Centered Learning

We are seeking proposals from researchers and research institutions that describe one- to two-year research projects that investigate the contexts, components, and impacts of student-centered learning approaches. In particular, we are looking to understand the effectiveness of specific student-centered practices, the conditions that support (and undermine) them, who most (and least) benefits from them, and why.

Access the full RFP and all submission information

The Students at the Center Distinguished Fellowship

This is a high impact, high visibility, two-year, competitive program open to only nine fellows. In the inaugural cohort, three fellowships will be reserved for researchers, three for policymakers, and three for practitioners. The practice and policy fellows must work and reside in New England, and the research fellows must be gathering and analyzing data from the New England area. Through a generous stipend, personalized competency coaching, interdisciplinary partnerships, and ample staff assistance, all Students at the Center Distinguished Fellows will receive the support they need to develop their research muscles in service of translating student-centered learning research for various stakeholders. The Fellows will work with the Collaborative’s Advisors, research teams, and staff to produce implementation tools that help schools ramp up their use of student-centered practices. Fellows will also curate and communicate findings from multiple fields to help the general public understand the value and positive impact student-centered practices can have.

Access the Fellowship application and all submission information